Appearances matter

So with the fascia on, it was crunch time…choosing colours! Tom gave me approximately 24 hours to choose the colour for my roof and couldn’t seem to understand THE. PRESSURE. involved. I’ve already established that I’m going for Colourbond on the roof at least, so that narrows it down to the range of Colourbond colours. There’s a start. I have collected a few ideas to guide me in the ‘look’ I want, but translating that into practical decisions proved a little harder than google searching.

98f59e5d3068ae68e8ec8d8253a95f98  cladding  947e73901b6b870f54c8f164586a1be5

Basically I love this style, but I also don’t know how I feel about such a dark colour on the outside. I love the tin but I’m worried about weight and combining too many elements and ending up with a busy, hodge-podge look. I really like the red windows but I’ve also chosen all timber windows and doors for a natural look and feel. I really love the miner’s cottage bullnose verandah and classic Aussie character but somehow I’m not sure Tom would entertain the idea of helping me fit one of those in somewhere. Can you see what I’m up against?

Finding a look you like is one thing, but it gets complicated when you have to factor in weight limits and practical elements as well. I had originally thought about putting Colourbond on the outside as cladding as well but have since decided it might end up looking like a tiny shed. Now I have such lovely gables on my roof it only seems right to try and make the rest of the house look just as nice! Tom got me onto the idea of profiled cladding, sheets of ply that look like weather boards or timber. It’s strong, easy (and a lot quicker) to install and hopefully light enough too. It’s a bit crazy how much different products can vary in weight, anywhere from close to 20kgs/mdown to my front runner at the moment, Shadowclad, which comes in at 6.6kgs/m2. I’ve calculated roughly 52 mof outside wall space to cover and with a total weight allowance of 3200kgs, the 350kgs of cladding is a surprising portion of that. This will be added to the roof (200kgs?), the timber frame, the inside lining, my giant double glazed glass doors, my cast iron combustion oven (120kgs), plus about a million things I haven’t even considered yet…it adds up quickly. Gulp.

Shadowclad-Groove-Natural   9036de26008be739b02d481055d44a4d

One worry was that the Shadowclad only comes with vertical grooves and it seems semi unusual for tiny houses to have vertical cladding according to my near constant scrutiny via google. I was slightly worried that maybe the traditional gable old fashioned style roof wouldn’t match up with vertical boards (probably a silly worry, but you just never know these things right?!). As seems to be happening lately, the universe provides and last night’s Grand Designs featured an American Gothic style house – very traditional gables with, you guessed it, straight up and down cladding! I doubt I’ll commit to the style much more than that (possibly some lacy bits under my eaves?) but it went a long way to reassure me that it wouldn’t look ridiculous.

Anyway, back to the point: after extensive deliberation (read stressing out) I managed to settle on Ironstone for my roof. It was a toss up between Monument (too dark), Deep Ocean (too blue) and the middle ground of Ironstone (seems obvious now, right?).

Another tiny step forward. Breathe. Readjust. Next?

Considering one element of this project at a time is genuinely the only way I have found enough brain space and capacity to tackle it. I suppose that’s the saying though right, how do you eat an elephant? (Actually that’s a bit of an awful analogy. Who would want to eat an elephant?!) But you get the point.

Shout out here to my TH project manager buddy, Brodie – your endless patience and sensible advice are saving more than just my sanity I’m sure! 😉 Thank you xx

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